Shallow Owl

18:59 Cholis Back 0 Comments

Why do 100,000 Owl fans see one and two head coaches see another?
Every time I watch Chester Stewart drop back to pass, and I've been doing a lot of that over the last four years, I think of the 2001 movie Shallow Hal.
In it, Jack Black can look at a 500-pound woman (played by a guy in a fat suit, presumably) and see only Gweneth Paltrow.
So far, we've had two coaching staffs fall in love with Chester.
One, led by Al Golden, was hit over the head during the first quarter of last year's Bowling Green game after a pick six and pulled Chester in favor of Mike Gerardi.
Stewart never saw the field again in 2010.
When I watch Chester, I see poor mechanics, terrible reads on the option, a penchant for holding onto the ball way too long, no touch on deep throws, blinders for field vision and not a whole lot of mobility. Any quarterback worth his Lee Saltz has to know whether or not he's behind or in front of the sticks.

The second, led by Steve Addazio, has yet to pull the plug. Maybe if Chester had tossed that pick 6 in the first quarter, the Owls might have recovered to be 4-1 in the MAC East, instead of 3-2.
Bowling Green 13, Temple 10.
What am I missing here?
I'm sure he's a nice kid with a great personality and might look like a combination of Brett Favre, Randall Cunningham and Tom Brady at the Edberg-Olson Complex for six days of the week, but I feel like Jason Alexander.
I'm not seeing the beauty on game day. I have not for four years.
Alexander played the friend of Jack Black, who spent most of the two hours shrugging his shoulder and trying to knock some sense into him.
When I watch Chester, I see poor mechanics, terrible reads on the option, a penchant for holding onto the ball way too long, no touch on deep throws, blinders for field vision and not a whole lot of mobility. Any quarterback worth his Lee Saltz has to know whether or not he's behind or in front of the sticks.
Other than that, he's beautiful.
Now Chester wasn't the ONLY reason Temple lost on Saturday.
Twelve penalties (to Bowling Green's two) certainly did not help.
(I thought A LOT of those penalties on Temple were questionable and my suspicions were only re-inforced when Bernard Pierce landed what seemed like five yards into the end zone via the air on his touchdown and the refs placed the ball at the one. Hmm. Wishful officiating, perhaps?)
Still, despite all of that, one cannot underestimate the psychological impact to the defense when the offense constantly goes three and out. That was the 10th-best defense in this year's MAC they were playing, not the 1985 Chicago Bears.
Moving the sticks on the field is on the quarterback, like it or not.
Fixing the problem and making the hard (or easy) decision off the field in this case is on the head coach.
Otherwise, we could all be seeing ugly.